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About MDM
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About MDM

Motor Decisions MatterSM is a national public-awareness campaign sponsored by a consortium of electric utilities, industry trade associations, and others. MDM and its sponsoring organizations provide support for companies interested in motor management in the following ways:

  • Tools: guides that outline the basic components of effective motor management, and spreadsheets that allow users to complete simple, "back of the envelope" calculations of life cycle cost analysis.
  • Webcasts: users can participate in online informational events that cover the basics of motor management and demonstrate how to use MDM tools.
  • Information: direction to helpful resources about topics such as energy legislation, motor repair, motor selection, and DOE and EPA resources.

Media
Please see the FAQs below for background information about the MDM campaign. If you need additional information about the MDM campaign, MDM tools, or MDM events, we can connect you with the resources you need to complete your story. If you would like to reference MDM in your story, please contact Ted Jones, Industrial Sector Lead with the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, at 617-337-9276.

MDM FAQ

1. Why was the Motor Decisions Matter campaign formed?
2. How do I know if my local distributor, repair center or utility representative is participating in Motor Decisions Matter and can help me develop a motor plan?
3. What should be taken into consideration when deciding whether to repair a failed motor or purchase a new one?
4. What is the average cost difference between a standard efficiency motor and one classified as premium efficient?
5. What is the definition of premium efficiency?
6. How can I calculate my potential energy savings by using a motor management plan?
7. What other tools are available through the campaign to help develop a motor management plan?
8. When the energy crunch has lifted, should I still have a motor plan in place?
9. How often should my motor plan be reviewed and updated?
10. Should larger or smaller companies consider having a motor plan?
11. How long does it take to put together a motor plan?
12.

How do government agencies, organizations and companies become a Motor Decisions Matter sponsor?

 

Q. Why was the Motor Decisions Matter campaign formed?
A.

The Motor Decisions Matter Campaign was formed because few customers were taking the time to evaluate common motor-related decisions, such as repairing, replacing or sizing their motors. For instance, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, only 12 percent consider the energy operating costs associated with their motor decisions. As a result, few customers were demanding premium efficiency motors or specifying best practice repairs even though these choices could save time, energy and money for their plants and facilities. A common shared interest in motor management mobilized a coalition of motor manufacturers, motor service centers, electric utilities, and government agencies to establish the Motor Decisions Matter campaign. Through the campaign, the sponsors intend to raise customer awareness, provide a common message and draw from a common set of resources when discussing motor efficiency opportunities with customers. Additional background information is captured in the press release from the MDM Campaign's launch in 2001.

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Q.

How do I know if my local distributor, repair center or utility representative is participating in Motor Decisions Matter and can help me develop a motor plan?

A.

Just ask them. Any knowledgeable motor service professional should be able to help you develop a viable motor plan addressing factors such as local prices for electricity, repair services, and new motors. Several motor professionals are participating in the campaign and have access to Motors Decisions Matter materials through their membership in NEMA, EASA, and CEE. The Motor Decisions Matter Web site (www.motorsmatter.org) also provides valuable links, tools and resources to assist motor professionals in developing sound motor plans.

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Q. What should be taken into consideration when deciding whether to repair a failed motor or purchase a new one?
A.

Your local repair firm/distributor can assist you in developing a customized motor management plan that best suits your business needs. A motor management plan should contain a written set of criteria for repair/replace decisions, stipulate decisions for critical applications or outline a repair/replace decision for each motor in the inventory and list all spares that can be used for different applications.

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Q. What is the average cost difference between a standard efficiency motor and one classified as premium efficient?
A.

The incremental price difference between standard and premium efficiency motors varies by motor size, type and availability. In some cases, premium efficiency motors can be 20 to 30 percent more expensive. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy’s MotorMaster+® database indicates that some premium efficiency motors are now available for the same price or less than standard efficiency motors. Since most motors are obtained at a substantial discount from retail (which is the cost listed in MotorMaster+), the cost increment can be even less. In many cases, the incremental cost of a premium efficiency motor is insignificant compared to the amount of energy costs the motor will save in the long run.

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Q. What is the definition of premium efficiency?
A.

In general, premium efficiency motors are those motors that exceeded the minimum standards required by the federal Energy Policy Act of 1992 by a significant margin. NEMA has released a premium efficiency motor specification and brand, called NEMA Premium®, which has been endorsed by the motor industry, the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) and many CEE-member utilities that administer motor efficiency programs across the United States and Canada. Premium efficiency motors are typically constructed with superior materials and have more copper, tighter tolerances and longer warranties.

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Q. How can I calculate my potential energy savings by using a motor management plan?
A.

A variety of tools are available to help you calculate the energy savings of premium efficiency motors and quality repair services, including the MDM Simple Savings Chart and 1*2*3 Spreadsheet. Your local distributor, repair center, or utility representative will also have the experience and information needed to help you make these calculations.

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Q. What other tools are available through the campaign to help develop a motor management plan?
A.

The Web site (www.motorsmatter.org) references a variety of resources and information to help you get started. To get started, check out the Motor Planning Kit which includes:

  • Checklist of steps to get started on developing a motor plan
  • Links to online resources to get more information about motor planning
  • Examples of how motor management strategies have been implemented

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Q. When the energy crunch has lifted, should I still have a motor plan in place?
A.

Absolutely. Cutting energy costs is beneficial to a company in any economic environment. By having a motor plan complete, you will be prepared to make sound decisions regarding the repair/replacement of a failed motor rather than making rush decisions. The amount of money saved on energy costs by using premium efficiency motors and having a well thought-out motor plan in place could be quite substantial over the life of your motor. There are important non-energy benefits as well such as reduced equipment downtime, longer motor life, and less noise.

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Q. How often should my motor plan be reviewed and updated?
A.

A motor plan should be reviewed at least once a year. At the same time, a spot check of motors and their condition should also be conducted on a regular basis. As the conditions of the motors and technology changes, so should the motor plan.

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Q. Should larger or smaller companies consider having a motor plan?
A.

Any company that has electric motors needs a plan. Efficiency improvements made in any capacity to equipment operated thousands of hours per year makes economic sense, no matter how large or small the company. Decreased energy costs are a realized benefit to any company as well as important non-energy benefits such as reduced equipment downtime, longer motor life, and less noise.

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Q. How long does it take to put together a motor plan?
A.

With the information and tools provided by the Motor Decisions Matter campaign, putting together a basic motor plan can be a simple task. With the help of your local distributor, trade association, repair center or utility representative, developing a sound motor plan becomes even easier. The amount of time invested in developing the plan will be well worth the amount of energy savings a company will experience.

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Q. How can an organization become a Motor Decisions Matter campaign sponsor?
A.

To become a Motor Decisions Matter sponsor, contact Ted Jones, Industrial Sector Lead for the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) at 617-337-9276. CEE is an award-winning consortium of efficiency program administrators from across the United States and Canada who work together on common approaches to advancing efficiency.

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